November 3, 2007

because you have a sick obsession

Posted in mousie at 10:05 pm by Anonymouse

I swear, if you knew me in real life, you would not think that my fertility issues were the most interesting thing about me – not even close.  However, it is apparent to me that to the Internet, I am most fascinating, captivating and readable when I’m discussing this nonsense that has plagued me.  So, for posterity and because I love you, dear Internet, here is the scoop as things sit today.  (In bulleted format, because that’s my favorite, and I’m so the boss of this blog.)

  • Today I bought a box of 4 pregnancy tests because they were on sale at Costco.  I still feel really juvenile buying pregnancy tests.  I feel like I’m 13 and I’m at Wal-Mart buying tampons for the first time ever.  How embarrassing!  What if someone I know sees me?!
  • Husband and I made some decisions regarding the RE’s recommendations:
    • No to chromosome testing
    • No to IUI (this was a no-brainer for us)
    • No to dye test
    • No to additional blood tests
    • Yes to metformin (this deserves a whole post with singular devotion, but I don’t really know how to describe what this has done to my stomach delicately and yet with full effect)
    • Yes to femara when we decide to start “trying” (umm…can we come up with a better phrase for this than “trying”?  Seriously.)
    • Yes to a baby aspirin a day
    • Yes to a round of antibiotics for Husband and me – to clear up any bacterial things that might have been happening
    • No to additional RE appointments

Making those decisions was kind of a two step process.  We made some initial decisions and then after a few weeks of stress on my part, Husband suggested we go back and re-look the rest of the decisions and it was as if it hadn’t occurred to me that we had any other options.  It was like a million pounds were lifted off of me when we did that.  I knew he was a gem when I married him.  I can go into detail on the different decisions if anyone is curious as to why we decided what we decided with each different bullet points.  There isn’t necessarily a lot of deep soul searching thought processes behind all of these decisions though, so if you ask and you think my reasons are lame, don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Blog topics to look forward to that may or may not be related to this post:

  • hope & faith – not just a cancelled Kelly Ripa sitcom
  • metformin and why I don’t buy generic toilet paper
  • first impressions, blond moments, and proving that I’m smrt
Advertisements

4 Comments »

  1. shoeaddict said,

    I’m on Metformin ,too. I know how you feel. I’m scared to come here because of the crazy similiarities!

    Why “no” to IUI? I know what it is but just wondering why…

  2. anonymouseandcheese said,

    No to IUI because I’ve never had trouble getting pregnant. I don’t see the point of paying some doctor to get me pregnant when it is more fun to do i for free in the bedroom.

  3. rlnathan said,

    Just curious why you said no to the chromosome testing.

  4. anonymouseandcheese said,

    The chromosome testing. We didn’t do it for a few reasons:
    1. The testing was going to cost approx. $800 that our insurance would not cover.

    2. Our RE told us that there was an 8% chance of finding anything as a result of the testing.

    3. She also said that if the testing resulted in any kind of finding that our options would then be donor sperm – which we don’t feel is the right choice for us, IVF to include choosing some embryos and discarding others – which we feel strongly is abortive and therefore not an option, or adoption – which is our next logical step once we’ve exhausted the old-fashioned route.

    I don’t have any problem with people who do the IUIs or do donor sperm. For us, it isn’t the right choice – or at least isn’t right now or in the near future.

    The major drawback (in my mind) to not doing the chromosome testing is that it is a possible diagnosis. It seems like things would be so much simpler if there was just an answer to the questions of “why?” or a diagnosis to point to or blame.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: